6 Tons on the move…

From Doug W.

“Trip to Vermilion pulling an empty trailer went uneventfully Thursday night.  Took a while to get the loaded on the trailer.  We put the mast through the bow pulpit and built a stand for the aft end of the mast.  On the trailer, the boat was less than 13′ to the bow pulpit, and with the trailer about 12,000 lbs going down the road.  It was a stressful ride home for sure.  Thought the tires were fine, but once loaded with all that weight two started to go down. I changed one to the spare and nursed the other one the rest of the way home.  It was a stressful ride for sure but all is well. “

Advertisements

Piranha has a new owner!

From Doug W.

“Tomorrow I head down to Vermilion Ohio to pick up my new-to-me 1987 Express 34, hull #22. The boat is a one owner boat currently called Piranha 3, and was bought new from a dealer in Ohio back in the day. The boat has never left the waters of Lake Erie. It’s new home will be here in Traverse City Michigan, where I have raced / owned / restored a dozen or so boats over the last 25 years. When I inspected the boat I was pleasantly surprised by the condition of the bottom which has been barrier coated and Baltoplated. She needs a good sanding and burnishing but no big deal.

The topsides were excellent, and the deck was like new. Not sure there is a craze mark in the deck. The deck hardware is completely original, including the nine winch layout and horn cleats for the halyards. I was amped to buy the boat until I went down below. As I understand it, the former owner is now in his nineties, and his loyal crew are also his loyal children who are in there 60’s. It’s clearly been a few years (decades??) since she was cleaned stem to stern.

The woodwork appears original, and is showing the wear of 30 years of beer can racing. The cabin sole is in throw away condition. The bulkhead suffered the anchor locker leak and was replaced back in 2004. The repair was well done, but the bottom the of wood bulkhead and frame around the mast are showing signs of absorbing water from below. The sails are out dated. The electronics partially functioning.

Piranha interior

Long story short, the interior was somewhat disheartening, though bringing her back would be a labor of love (and labor), not necessarily and significant expense. I made an offer well below asking price prior to inspecting the boat and the owners had countered well above my offer. After my inspection, I was glad I hadn’t agreed to their counter and walked away and made an offer on a different boat. A few days later, they accepted by original offer so I had the boat structurally surveyed. Having owning many J boats and having had core issues on almost all of them, I expected the worse. To my pleasant surprise the boat surveyed very well, with dry readings throughout deck bottom and topsides. Now hoping that the work needed is mostly cosmetic, we closed the deal and tomorrow the adventure begins.

The boat has a roller furler and that will stay. Am working with my sailmaker and PHRF to determine feasibility of 37″ sprit and asymmetric kites only. If you have ever raced boats with sprits / a sails and roller furlers, you know that is the most crew-friendly way to sail. My last boat was a J92 and the asym / sprit / and furler combo was awesome. Will sail the boat for a year to try to understand the mindset behind the nine winches. Will replace floorboards, hopefully with something synthetic, and do my best to clean up the wood work.

My biggest ambition is to expand the aft quarter berth by removing the center longitudinal bulkhead under the center of the cockpit floor. I’m baffled by the immense vacant expanse aft of the gallery in the rear port quarter. The line drawings seem to indicate it was meant to be storage accessed from above, but the only way to access that space on my boat is from the starboard quarter berth through an opening in the longitudinal bulkhead. It seems like a huge waste of space. I had a Tripp 33 and loved the queen / king size that stretched side to side aft of the engine, and the Express would hugely benefit by a bunk big enough for my 6’2″ frame.

Exciting prospects. Will keep you posted of progress.”

Projects – The good, bad and the ugly.

You see, in this world there’s two kinds of people, my friend: Those with Express 34s and those who dig. You dig.

The sailing season is winding down. That means that the project season is winding up!

What are you working on? I want you to record your projects and send them to me.

The good, bad and the ugly. I’ll take them all.

This is how we learn.

Raw Water Blues

So my Yanmar 3YM20 engine is pretty new ~600 hrs – which for a diesel is barely just getting out of bed in the morning. A couple of weeks ago I noticed some water in the bilge and back traced it to the seawater pump on the engine. The hoses were my first suspects but they turned out to be fine.
I pulled the pump and found it was leaking from one of the seals around the bearing on the shaft. After doing some research I had three options:

  1. Rebuild the pump myself
  2. Buy a new pump
  3. Have somebody else rebuild it

I could have rebuilt it myself but I don’t have a bearing press. Yes…I know I could constructed a homemade press using a rudimentary lathe but the it seemed like a hassle and something with lots of fiddly bits and parts in freezers that I’m prone to screw up.

I called the local Yanmar dealer and gave them the part number.
“We don’t have that and we don’t know what it is… can you send us pictures?”
Are you serious? I sent them pictures.
“Hmm…never seen one like that before…not in our books…don’t know…we have something similar for $350”
Yanmar dealers out of your area won’t even talk to you. $350? Are you kidding me?

So bless the electronic heart of the internet I found Tony at the Flying Dutchman Pump Rebuilders.

For a $130 he cleaned it, rebuilt the pump, including machining the shaft and surfacing the face plate, installed new stainless steel  springs and explained to me what was wrong and why these crappy pumps routinely fail and that I should use Super Lube grease when I change my impeller. Oh, and that includes shipping back to me.

And he painted it.

Tony and his crew are my heroes!

Flying Dutchman
Tony Coenradi
200 Davis Creek Road
Selma, OR  97538    USA
Toll free (U.S. and Canada) 1-888-595-1110
Tony@fdrbp.com
http://www.water-pump-rebuilders.com/

The Less-Than-Stellar Raw Water Pump

Close up of the old leaking raw water (seawater) pump.

The rebuilt pump!

 

The microwave

To complete the transition from the old propane GSI stove I’ve wired a new circuit and installed an microwave oven. Hardest part was routing the wire underneath the fridge and stove fiberglass liner. My arms aren’t long enough so I had to use a fish tape. Installed a GFCI outlet with a weatherproof box. The strap holds it from bouncing around but the oven slides a little bit on the glossy paint so I’ll have to fix that…

Microwave oven